Leang Seckon's 'Hell on Earth' extended!

27 JUNE–8 August 2014
Hours: Mon.–Sat., 10:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

Asia House
63 New Cavendish Street
LONDON W1G 7LP

We are delighted to announce that Leang Seckon's exhibition Hell on Earth has been extended until Saturday 9 August 2014.

The exhibition has received a thoroughly positive response from visitors, and has received wonderful press coverage. This includes Leang Seckon's live interview on BBC World News' programme Impact (watch the video here) and and his interview with The Times' Catherine Nixey that was published in the Times Saturday Review (read the article here). Leang Seckon's discussion with SOAS researcher and lecturer, Dr. Peter Sharrock, can also be seen here.

The exhibition has also been featured in publications and online blogs such as Cambodia Daily, the Culture Trip and One World.

Image: Leang Seckon, King Sihanouk's Funeral, 2012, mixed media on canvas, 50 x 40 cm (19¾ x 15¾ in)

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Konstantin Bessmertny at Museu Fundação Oriente

24 JULY–14 SEPTEMBER 2014

Museu Fundação Oriente
Avenida de Brasília,
Doca de Alcântara (Norte),
1350-352 Lisboa,
Portugal

365. A Work a Day at the Museu Fundação Oriente, Lisboa is an exhibition of Konstantin Bessmertny's "Project 365". The series consists of individual works, each measuring 39 x 28 cm, that were created every day from the 15th September 2012, and was completed on the 15th September 2013.

Image: Konstantin Bessmerty, Project 365: 2013.04.16, 2013, mixed media on paper, 39 x 28 cm (15 ½ x 11 in).

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Tenzing Rigdol's 'Bringing Tibet Home' screening at Asian American International Film Festival

31 JULY 2014, 8:30 p.m., followed by Q&A with director Tenzin Tsetan Choklay

Asian American International Film Festival (AAIFF)

City Cinema Village East
189 2nd Ave
New York
NY 10003

for tickets: AAIFF

Bringing Tibet Home, the documentary about the journey behind New York-based Tibetan artist Tenzing Rigdol's courageous installation, Our Land, Our People. The installation involved the smuggling of 20 tonnes of native Tibetan soil across the borders of three countries that border the Himalayas. The soil was finally isntalled on a platform in Dharamsala, India, giving the chance for thousands of Tibetans in exile in Dharamsala to set foot on their native soil.

The documentary will be screened in New York as part of the Asian American International Film Festival and will be followed by a Q&A with the director, Tenzin Tsetan Choklay.

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Leang Seckon on BBC World News

On 7th July Leang Seckon was interviewed live at the BBC Broadcasting House by Karin Giannone for the programme Impact. The interview touched upon Seckon's experiences growing up in the Khmer Rouge, some of his works included in Hell on Earth and also his monumental installation Naga (2008).

A video of the interview can be watched on our website here: http://www.rossirossi.com/contemporary/exhibitions/hell-on-earth/video.2

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Palden Weinreb in 'the air we swim in' at BRIC Arts

10 JULY–31 AUGUST 2014

The Project Room at BRIC House
647 Fulton Street
(Enter on Rockwell Place)
Brooklyn, NY 11217

The air we swim in will be on view in the Project Room of BRIC House this summer. Curated by Kelly Schroer, the exhibition will focus on artists who create physical interactions with intangible elements that inhabit our same space, but are invisible to the human eye.This fascination with invisible elements in the air acts as a starting point in expressing our human need to make sense of the world around us. The exhibition will feature artists Hanny Ahern, Thessia Macahdo, Eric Shows and Palden Weinreb. Through drawing, sculpture, and interactive installations, the artists exhibited in The air we swim in create tactile sensations out of sound waves, energy and light waves, breath, and microscopic particles.

Image: Palden Weinreb, Untitled, 2014.

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Video: Leang Seckon in Conversation with Dr. Peter Sharrock

On Saturday 28 June 2014, Cambodian artist Leang Seckon was joined in conversation by Dr. Peter Sharrock at Asia House, London. For those who missed the event, the video can be watched online here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3VrN88MYrQ

Tenzing Rigdol at the IV Moscow International Biennale for Young Art

26 JUNE–10 AUGUST 2014

A Time for Dreams

Moscow Museum of Modern Art
17 Ermolaevsky Lane,
Moscow 123001,
Russia

Curator David Elliot chose the theme for the IV Moscow International Biennale for Young Art, A Time for Dreams, by rephrasing the famous "I have a dream" speech by Dr. Martin Luther King. With this title, Elliot emphasises the chronic instability of our time and the acute need for the young generation to have dreams, hopes and opportunities, to not blindly go with the flow but to invest their strenght into the perfection of the world. A Time for Dreams features works by 83 artists hailing from 32 countries, all under the age of 35, including Tibetan artist Tenzing Rigdol whose work, My World is in Your Blind Spot, highlights the insecurity of Tibet's future by drawing the recent increase in self-immolations by Tibetans to the viewers attention.

Image: Tenzing Rigdol, My World is in Your Blind-Spot (detail), 2014, silk brocade and scripture, five panels, each 182 x 182 cm (6 x 6 ft).

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Opening this month: Leang Seckon, 'Hell on Earth' at Asia House, London

27 JUNE–25 JULY 2014
Hours: Mon.-Sat., 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

PRIVATE VIEWING: 26 JUNE 2014, 6–8PM

ARTIST TALK: 28 JUNE 2014, 2PM (reserve seats here)

ASIA HOUSE
63 NEW CAVENDISH STREET
LONDON W1G 7LP

T: + 44 (0) 20 7734 6487

Rossi & Rossi is pleased to announce Hell on Earth, contemporary Cambodian artist Leang Seckon’s second solo show with the gallery. The exhibition, held at Asia House, London, features a body of recent paintings, collages and video works by the artist.

Seckon grew up during the devastating period of Khmer Rouge rule, witnessing firsthand the government-enforced policies that led to famine and disease, as well as state executions. He describes this period as “hell on earth”, when the haunting prophecies found in a set of popular nineteenth-century Buddhist texts, the Buddh Damnay, were realized: “war will break out on all sides…blood will flow up to the bellies of elephants; there will be houses with no people in them, roads upon which no-one travels; there will be rice but nothing to eat”. The prophecies provided Cambodians with an explanation for the violence and destruction of the Khmer Rouge, placing the period within the cyclical pattern of Buddhist history.

The artist’s collages and paintings are intimate narratives of his memories from the period and the civil war that followed. The process of creating artworks simultaneously allows him to experience and express the freedom that was denied to him as a youth. However, Seckon’s work also acts as a warning: like the Buddh Damnay, it cautions against corruption and the destruction of the environment, drawing parallels between Cambodia’s present and its past.

A fully illustrated catalogue with an essay by renowned curator Jens Hoffmann accompanies the exhibition.

On 28 June, Leang Seckon will be joined by Dr. Peter Sharrock (SOAS) to discuss the artist's approaches to his work and the impact of Cambodia's turbulent and complex history on his practice. The talk is free to attend, however seat reservations are recommended. To reserve a seat please visit: leangseckon.eventbrite.co.uk

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Opening this month: Impermanence at Rossi & Rossi Hong Kong

21 JUNE–24 AUGUST 2014
PRIVATE VIEW: 21 JUNE, 3–7PM

Rossi & Rossi Hong Kong
Yally Industrial Building, Unit 3C
Wong Chuk Hang
Hong Kong

T: +852 3573 9417

Rossi & Rossi is pleased to present Impermanence, an exhibition of new and recent works by contemporary Tibetan artists living in Tibet and around the world. The first such exhibition devoted solely to contemporary Tibetan art to be held in Hong Kong, it features paintings, sculptures and installations by Benchung, Marie Dolma Chophel, Dedron, Gade, Tulku Jamyang, Kesang Lamdark, Nortse, Tsering Nyandak, Tashi Puncog, Tenzing Rigdol,Tsherin Sherpa, Sodhon, TaNor and Palden Weinreb.

The exhibition focuses on the concept of ‘impermanence’ (Pali: anicca, Tibetan: mi rtag pa, Chinese: 無常), which is considered to be one of the three essential doctrines of Buddhist philosophy. In short, while everything in the universe is subject to change, nothing is certain or lasts forever. The Upali Sutta recalls a conversation between the Buddha and a Jain householder named Upali, in which the Buddha argues, “whatever rises has the nature of ceasing”. At first glance, this concept appears to provide a negative outlook on life; however, ‘impermanence’ can also be seen as the vital component that allows for change to occur, whether for better or for worse. One only has to look around to realise how true this is, be it on a small, individual scale—aging, dying, learning, developing—or on a large, global scale: seasons changing, governments falling, national borders being redefined.

Tibetans are all too aware of the fragility of life. Impermanence therefore aims to provide a vantage point from which contemporary Tibetan art can be examined and interpreted.Given Tibet’s recent history, the works included in the exhibition are understandably political. Faced with the impact of globalisation, exposure to new cultures and modernisation, the featured artists have adapted traditional Buddhist iconography, media and motifs to reflect upon the experiences of Tibetans around the world. Their vivid works comment on identity, security, the environment and the future of Buddhism—all increasingly complex concerns for Tibetans living both in their homeland and in exile.

Image: Tenzing Rigdol, Monologue 2, 2014, 24-karat gold on treated canvas, 76 x 61 cm (30 x 24 in)

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Event: Leang Seckon in conversation with Dr. Peter Sharrock

28 JUNE, 2PM

ASIA HOUSE
63 New Cavendish St
W1G 7LP

Rossi & Rossi is excited to announce that on the 28th of June, renowned Cambodian artist Leang Seckon will be joined by SOAS lecturer and art historian Dr. Peter Sharrock in conversation at Asia House. Their discussion will touch upon the unique and tumultuous history of Indochina – a history that both Seckon and Sharrock have experienced firsthand.

The event is free to attend, however reservations are recommended. Seats can be reserved online at leangseckon.eventbrite.co.uk or by contacting the gallery (info@rossirossi.com; +44 (0) 20 7734 6487).

Seckon grew up during the devastating period of Khmer Rouge rule, witnessing firsthand the government-enforced policies that led to famine and disease, as well as state executions. He describes this period as “hell on earth”, when the haunting prophecies found in a set of popular nineteenth-century Buddhist texts, the Buddh Damnay, were realized: “war will break out on all sides…blood will flow up to the bellies of elephants; there will be houses with no people in them, roads upon which no-one travels; there will be rice but nothing to eat”. The prophecies provided Cambodians with an explanation for the violence and destruction of the Khmer Rouge, placing the period within the cyclical pattern of Buddhist history.

The artist’s collages and paintings are intimate narratives of his memories from the period and the civil war that followed. The process of creating artworks simultaneously allows him to experience and express the freedom that was denied to him as a youth. However, Seckon’s work also acts as a warning: like the Buddh Damnay, it cautions against corruption and the destruction of the environment, drawing parallels between Cambodia’s present and its past.

Dr. Peter Sharrock made his first visit to Southeast Asia in 1970 as a Reuters’ correspondent. The war put the large Angkor temple complex out of reach and this was prolonged as Cambodia closed on itself. He finally reached Angkor in 1990, when landmines abounded and control of temples passed daily between the government and the Khmer Rouges. He obtained his doctorate on Buddhism and Imperial politics as discerned through the sacred art of the Khmer civilisation from SOAS, where he now lectures and researches.

ImagE: Leang Seckon, Bang Skol (Blessing to Heaven), 2013, mixed media and collage on canvas, 200 x 200 cm (79 x 79 in)

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